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“Quasi-investigation” and “British humor”: the Kremlin reacted to a report on the Litvinenko’s case

The spokesman of the Russian president called the report on Alexander Litvinenko’s case published on Thursday a “quasi-investigation”
"Quasi-investigation” and “British humor": the Kremlin reacted to a report on the Litvinenko’s case

Dmitry Peskov, the spokesman of the Russian president Vladimir Putin, commented on the report on the results of an inquiry on Alexander Litvinenko’s case and called it a “quasi-investigation” and “British humor”, Joinfo.ua reports with reference to TASS.

“Why quasi-investigation? Because we are talking about some judgments based on probabilities, on the use of words “possible” and “probably”. Such terms are not allowed in our court practice, not allowed in the court practice of other countries and can not be considered as a verdict in any part”, – said the president’s press secretary, Dmitry Peskov.

Also, according to Peskov, the conclusions of British experts “in general, are more likely to be attributed to this elegant British humor.” “Because a public inquiry based on private data of unnamed intelligence services and a verdict issued based on these ephemeral data, based on the use of the words “possibly” and “probably, “- he stressed once again.

Peskov assured that Russia does not feel animosity towards the United Kingdom.

“We have always valued good relations with Britain. And after the tragedy occurred with Litvinenko, Russia was counting on a close relationship with Britain in the investigation of this case. Unfortunately, the British went on to freeze not only interaction, but also dialogue in the vast majority of areas. Russia has never initiated the freezing,”- said Peskov.

The official London called on Moscow to respond to the issues raised in the final report on the case of the poisoning of former FSB officer Alexander Litvinenko.

According to Peskov, summoning of the Russian ambassador is a normal diplomatic practice. He promised that the Russian side will provide answers to all questions through diplomatic channels.

It should be recalled that on January 21, the judge of the High Court of London, Sir Robert Owen announced conclusions of the inquiry on the murder of ex-Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko in 2006. Sir Robert Owen came to the conclusion that the murder of ex-Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko in 2006 in the UK was “probably” approved by President Vladimir Putin.