Home / World / Efforts of U.S. and EU in the Middle East triggered exclusively by matter of their own safety – The Economist

Efforts of U.S. and EU in the Middle East triggered exclusively by matter of their own safety – The Economist

"Those who hope the strike heralds America's military re-engagement in Libya after four years of watching from the side-lines are likely to be disappointed," the article reads.

Efforts of U.S. and EU in the Middle East triggered exclusively by matter of their own safety - The Economist

Despite the air strikes of the United States aimed at elimination of the jihadist leaders in Libya, the administration of the United States President Barack Obama is trying to limit its involvement in the Middle East, the authoritative British publication The Economist writes.

The article notes that four years after the U.S. airstrikes helped the Libyan rebels to overthrow the regime of the dictator Muammar Qaddafi, it became known that the U.S. military in Libya eliminated Mokhtar Belmohtar, the leader of jihadists linked to al-Qaeda.

"Those who hope the strike heralds America's military re-engagement in Libya after four years of watching from the side-lines are likely to be disappointed. The Obama administration is keen to limit its commitment in the Middle East," The Economist writes.

According to the news agency, the activity of the United States is limited to counter-terrorist operations. Thus, in 2013 and 2014, for example, America sent commandos to Libya to seize the militants, who attacked the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi and Tanzania.

The Economist notes that any activity of the European forces in the Middle East is motivated by the issues of their own security.

"Libya remains torn between two alliances of tribes and militias, each with its own parliament and foreign sponsors," the article notes, adding that the western part of the country is backed largely by Turkey, Qatar and the Islamic groups. However, the east is receiving military support from Egypt and the United Arab Emirates, fierce opponents of Islamists.

The authors of the news agency argue that the diplomatic circles are discussing the possibility of reunification of the country. In particular, the parliament in the east would serve as the lower house and the parliament in the west would comprise the bulk of a consultative "state council" of united Libya.

"America's strike adds new complexity. Will jihadists be weakened or galvanised to close ranks and aim attacks against the West? In a heavily tribal society, four years of fighting have generated thousands of fresh vendettas. Local militias will not readily cede the turf they have gained," The Economist sums up.