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‘Are we slowly becoming robots?': ‘biohackers’ in Germany implant LED lights into their hands

Their dreams come true! Three 'biohackers' in Germany implanted LED lights into their hands to light up tattoos
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According to the last information, a group of three men from Dusseldorf, Germany, had implanted Northstar V1 chips under their skin which look like rings of LED lights, Joinfo.com informs with the reference to Mirror.

It is known, that the rings of LED lights are slightly smaller than a £2 coin and thicker than a thumb.

It turns on using magnets and will illuminate any tattoos.

The surgery, offered by Grindhouse Wetware, uses ‘safe’ technology to mix humans with robots.

The operation came out of the desire of ‘biohackers’ to have something which lights up their tattoos.

Its founder Tim Cannon was one of the men to have the implant, which is supposed to emulate bioluminescence, the kind of light produced by animals like fireflies and some jellyfish.

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Two years ago he had a ‘cyborg’ chip the size of a cigarette packet inserted into him the which was designed to record data from his body.

It transferred the data to any Android-powered mobile device.

A company spokesperson said: “Northstar V1, much like piercings and cosmetic surgeries, is purely for aesthetic purposes.

“It is a simple device that will prove the possibility of implanting technology in the body and will pave the way for more advanced and functional augmentations.”

Writing on its Facebook page, the organisation said many people had become excited at the lights on Tim’s Circadia chip and wanted their own.

The post said: “Many people who saw the lights were very excited. They have been waiting years for something like this.

As reported earlier, scientists have proved that a touching story about human’s love to robots might be not so far-fetched as we are used to think. The new human experiment has shown that we are able to feel empathy for robots in ‘pain’, even if we know that they aren’t alive.