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Citizen Astronomer Reveals Jupiter’s ‘Face’ Caught By JunoCam

NASA's Juno spacecraft captured this image, titled “Jovey McJupiterface”, from an altitude of 12,075 miles (19,433 kilometers)
Citizen Astronomer Reveals Jupiter’s ‘Face’ Caught By JunoCam

This image, processed by citizen scientist Jason Major, is titled “Jovey McJupiterface,” Joinfo.com reports with reference to NASA.

Major received the Jupiter’s ‘face’ by rotating the image 180 degrees and orienting it from south up. Two white oval storms turn into eyeballs, and the “face” of Jupiter is revealed.

The original image was snapped by JunoCam during its seventh close pass of the planet on May 19, 2017, from about 29,100 miles (46,900 kilometers) above the cloud tops.

Juno has recently made a lovely closeup of the south polar region of the planet while racing away from Jupiter following its seventh close pass of the planet on May 19, 2017, from about 29,100 miles (46,900 kilometers) above the cloud tops.

Once every 53 days the Juno spacecraft close over Jupiter’s clouds. This sequence shows 14 enhanced-color images snapped by Juno spacecraft as it swooped by Jupiter.

Juno spacecraft entered Jupiter’s orbit on July 4. On Dec. 11, 2016, as it performed its third close flyby of Jupiter 15,300 miles (24,600 kilometers) from the planet, it caught on camera the seventh of eight features forming a ‘string of pearls’ on Jupiter — massive counterclockwise rotating storms that appear as white ovals in the gas giant’s southern hemisphere.